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Results-driven. Case studies galore.
Our work is our advocacy. These are just six of the many case studies on this site showcasing our work and the results we deliver for clients.
Mercury Rebrand Rollout
Mercury Rebrand Rollout
Meredith Connell Graham Street Branded Environment
Meredith Connell Graham Street Branded Environment
NZSO Marketing Campaign 2018
NZSO Marketing Campaign 2018
Victoria University of Wellington Undergraduate Recruitment Campaign 2018
Victoria University of Wellington Undergraduate Recruitment Campaign 2018
Te Papa's Hinatore Learning Lab branding
Te Papa's Hinatore Learning Lab branding
Watercare 2018 Annual Report
Watercare 2018 Annual Report
Victoria University of Wellington Undergraduate Recruitment Campaign 2018
Victoria University of Wellington Undergraduate Recruitment Campaign 2018
Tamaki Regeneration Company Branding
Tamaki Regeneration Company Branding
Our Expertise. What we do best.
So much more than your name, your logo or visual identity, a brand reflects what you stand for and how you want to be perceived.
So much more than your name, your logo or visual identity, a brand reflects what you stand for and how you want to be perceived.
The best brands are built inside out, effectively engaging and aligning staff perception and behaviour with strategy, culture and performance.
The best brands are built inside out, effectively engaging and aligning staff perception and behaviour with strategy, culture and performance.
We approach digital from a communication, not technical, perspective, engaging audiences online with brand-aligned experiences that are intuitive and rewarding.
We approach digital from a communication, not technical, perspective, engaging audiences online with brand-aligned experiences that are intuitive and rewarding.
Your communication and marketing programmes should be driven by clear insights, engaging audiences towards the desired action.
Your communication and marketing programmes should be driven by clear insights, engaging audiences towards the desired action.
The right environments reinforce brand and culture, drive behaviours and create an engaging environment for staff and visitors.
The right environments reinforce brand and culture, drive behaviours and create an engaging environment for staff and visitors.
Good investor communication is much more than just reporting. A clearly communicated long-term investor brand helps you attract, grow and retain investors and capital.
Good investor communication is much more than just reporting. A clearly communicated long-term investor brand helps you attract, grow and retain investors and capital.
Blog Posts. Thought-leading insights.

A creative celebration

21 May 2019 by Alice McKeown

Since I started at Insight Creative, there has been much talk about how we need to stop occasionally and take the time to celebrate our creative achievements. So with that in mind, let me introduce examples of great...

a creative celebration alice mckeown

since i started at insight creative, there has been much talk about how we need to stop occasionally and take the time to celebrate our creative achievements. so with that in mind, let me introduce examples of great typography created within the walls of insight within the last 12 months, as seen through the eyes of our design team:

custom typography / nz super

i just think it’s great that we took the time to create something bespoke for a client that many people might consider ‘a bit dry’. it’s going the extra mile for them, but also gives us something to feel chuffed about. the theme of the report was constant change, so the fact that the typogrpahy character changes and evolves throughout the document is really fascinating.
sarah turner

 

handwritten type / victoria university

the typography used for victoria university's 2019 recruitment campaign successfully delivers the concept of thoughts swirling around a young person’s mind. the hand-written form, using various sizes, cases, and styles, conveys the different options/thoughts when considering their future career, while also subtly promoting wellington. this all reinforces the strategic idea that you know your mind and that vic will teach you how to think, not what to think. composing those different type treatments together, evokes a compelling visual that connects with potential students making those big choices; it cleverly delivers the message that victoria university is the place where you can decide the route to fulfil your potential.
anna charlett

 

creating a 'black' font / breadcraft 

when do you get a chance to use a ‘black’ font? in my experience not that often. with this new range of wraps, we were aiming to express the ‘rebel’ at every touchpoint, and so we combined a slightly redrawn version of black future, redrawn copperplate gothic 33bc, aardvark and trade gothic. 
— brian slade

 

typography as a graphic device /  nzso

i really like the way the typography is the central graphical device in bringing the idea to life: “so… let’s begin. so… on with the show” is a really clever idea. bold and simple, with good use of colour and scale. 
— jo ross

 

architecturally inspired typography / 7 waterloo quay

we are working with argosy on some signage elements for 7 waterloo quay (formerly known as nz post house). we’ve developed a typographic approach informed by the brutalist architecture of the building. the feature 7 graphic made up of elements echoing ‘7’ and of similar proportion to concrete elements used in the building. 
— edwin hooper

 

good ol' helvetica neue / auckland airport annual report

here it is presented boldly in the airport's report. amongst the billion dollar busyness and ongoing construction at auckland airport, the typography adds a sense of confidence, clarity and calm; expressing the ongoing growth of the airport’s infrastructure through the repeated titles – underpinning the theme of the report ‘delivering, planning, building’. and of course the way it translates online is also great (as it should).
chris gough palmer

wordmark / mashmaster

the typography created/used for mashmaster word-based card game instantly reinforces the concept or ‘big idea’. by combining the ‘h’ and ‘m’ the concept of two elements combining to create a unique hybrid is visually represented. it shows the amalgamation of two elements becoming a quirky, and creative final product.
— alice mckeown 

 

design, creative celebration, insight creative, crated typography, typography

6 insights on Integrated Reporting from Ravensdown

16 May 2019 by Mike Tisdall

Guest post on Ravensdown’s Integrated Reporting journey by Gareth Richards, Group Communications Manager To listen is to learn  Every human being can recognise is when they’re being listened to. ...

6 insights on integrated reporting from ravensdown mike tisdall

guest post on ravensdown’s integrated reporting journey by gareth richards, group communications manager

to listen is to learn 

every human being can recognise is when they’re being listened to. 

for me, having been involved on a three-year journey with ravensdown, i think that’s the place to start. and perhaps can be summed up with a question: how much does the process of listening form your strategy?  

not just listening to people like our neighbours who are concerned with dust, noise and their property values. but listening to the signals that alert any business to opportunity and risk. listening to the sceptics and antagonists who may have a grain of truth in what they are saying. listening to the story your own people tell when they are asked what your company does and why they are here.  

so let’s talk about our integrated reporting journey and the ravensdown’s story . . .

 

the changing role of ravensdown

founded in 1977 as a buying co-operative, the company was set up by farmers to scour the globe looking for mineral fertilisers and nutrients to import and manufacture. for 40 years, this enabled farmers to grow food for animals and humans that became the envy of the world. 

but in 2017, it was clear that the co-operative was much more complex than a simple import-and-process model. it had adapted to its environment. its advisors were seen as critical parts of the farm teams  - fertiliser is farming’s second largest expense. and our highly qualified consultants advising on environmental mitigation became the fastest growing part of the business. new technology was bringing new precision and traceability so the right amount of the right nutrient went in the right place. 

instead of being seen only as a fertiliser manufacturer, we needed to be seen as the farm nutrient and environmental experts. that was who we really were. but like all integrated reporting journeys, ravensdown’s started with “why we are here”.  

and through the normal, maze-like process with lots of blind corners that most companies go through, we found our way out of the maze and with a sharply focused purpose:

enabling smarter farming for a better new zealand 

 

the integrated reporting journey

for the past three years, i’ve worked with the cfo, internal auditor, leadership team and board, and our design agency, insight creative, as we’ve moved closer to integrated reporting. i thought i’d share six insights about the experience with you today. 

as a comms guy, stories are my meat and drink. i started doing this job before corporate social responsibility became a thing, but i knew things had really changed when the head of our audit and risk committee told me that the stories in our integrated report had to be punchy and relatable. it felt like all the advice i’d been giving corporate finance people for 20 years was being played back to me!   

so… six insights. good news. we’ve already covered one of them!  

1.    the power of listening 

 

2.    starting with why  

starting with why (simon sinek) means thinking broadly about the intersection and combination of capitals that you impact and that impact you. we look for connectiona joining of the dots.  

for example:  profit becomes an outcome not a purpose. value becomes the lens with which to view the entire business. risks become more specific and manageable. the forward view comes into focus. 

it takes time! and it’s hard. we must have changed our business model diagram 25 different times and that in the first year alone! 

in terms of reporting, instead of listing every concern a stakeholder has, we share how we’re going about learning what matters. 

instead of listing every action we’ve taken, we highlight which aspects of our strategy relate to those things that matter. 

once you’re understanding what’s important to your stakeholders and business, are clear on your purpose and ideas on how to progress towards that, now you come to the question of how are you going to demonstrate progress?  what are you going to be reporting on? 

 

3.   choose the right targets

we all know the phrase “what gets measured gets managed.” that’s a lot more catchy than my version: “what gets publicly disclosed as a target that is comparable over time, receives sustained focus”.  

this has proved a challenge across the three years we’ve been trying - board and leadership team need to understand the implications and possible unforeseen consequences of declaring a target to the world. it would be easy to do badly. 

closely related to number 3 is…  

 

4.    get the right data

most of our targets and data sets were by functional silos where specialist managers report upward. but the data that’s easiest to find is not often the right data. we had a lot of financial data but nowhere near enough non-financial data. the holy grail is the integrated thinking that’s needed as you consider integrated reporting and the report itself. 

an integrated measure is harder to conceptualise and but worth persevering with… 

in our case, an example is the strength of a superphosphate granule. this is impacted by operational or procurement choices, by training and handling protocols, by capital investment in processing machinery and storage sheds. we report on this as a material indicator (its value relates to reputation and environmental impacts – a dusty granule is bad for neighbours and for farmers spreading near waterways). 

we started with the rear view mirror approach to quality and then we could move on to the forward view of targets around improvements. 

5.    look to leverage

  • in the first two years, our online report went from a pdf on our website to our own microsite, that’s also a link at the bottom of all staff’s email signatures: a good way to encourage staff to read and understand! 
  • managers go through the print document with their teams and every employee gets a copy with a personal letter from the ceo.  
  • the website is optimised for phones and contains videos and other animations you can’t get from the paper document. 
  • this year much of the compliance related information will be on the website, so the document doesn’t blow out to a hundred pages. in fact, the digital domain frees up the printed format, so it can break conventions of a typical looking annual report. this year we will also be sharing the site a lot more via linkedin, twitter and facebook and we will be making the site more sophisticated in terms of structure.  

 

i’ve saved the most important for the end. and that is all about how you make a start…

6.    just make a start!

there are 19 parts of an integrated reporting framework so it’s easy to get overwhelmed.  

but the key thing is to make a start and build momentum. it’s like getting on a roundabout. doesn’t matter where you get on or where you are on the ride, but that you’re actually on board and have changed your perspective.  

we knew that we weren’t aiming for a fully-fledged, quality assured integrated report from year one. it was more the spirit of integrated reporting we were going after. we called them stakeholder reviews for the two years. this year we will call it an integrated report. but like any good journey, we’re still learning and gaining clarity. 

 

one thing we are clear on. our reporting is a process of establishing trust. through transparency, disclosure and frankness. 

we can’t be scared of a bad result. better that performance gaps are identified than accusations of cherry picking or green washing. 

 

the benefits of <ir> to ravensdown that we've already seen

  • increased understanding of value creation
  • created opportunities 
  • reduced silo thinking in the business
  • great morale – especially ahead of criticism e.g. from activists…  
  • longer term and aspirational thinking
  • innovative
  • improving what is measured – better reporting

 

gareth richards, ravensdown

 

 

 

 

 

 

integrated reporting, getting started on integrated reporting, , insight creative, ravensdown, gareth richards

Integrated Reporting: Connectivity of Information

02 Apr 2019 by Mike Tisdall

It’s one of the core principles of an Integrated Report (<IR>). But many clients seem to think it’s one of the hardest. We’ll get to that in a minute – but spoiler alert: it isn’t really. First,...

integrated reporting: connectivity of information mike tisdall

it’s one of the core principles of an integrated report (<ir>). but many clients seem to think it’s one of the hardest. we’ll get to that in a minute – but spoiler alert: it isn’t really.

first, let’s consider why the <ir> framework considers it an important principle. basically, it’s because it’s really not that useful to look at material issues in isolation. there are interdependencies there whether you’ve noticed them consciously or not. and if you can surface these connections and the trade-offs between issues, it becomes easier to understand just how they affect each other. which in turn influences decision-making.

and here’s that easy way to get started that i alluded to above: in my experience, even if an organisation hasn’t been through a formal integrated thinking process, threads naturally occur and it’s just a matter of using fresh eyes to look at the tapestry to find the sometimes not-so-obvious synergies. because – credit to your leadership - there’s usually a strategy at play and you can join the dots if you look closely enough. 

and while this isn’t as good as being crisply intentional in strategy activation, at least it gives you a place to start if you’re embarking on an integrated reporting journey in an organisation that hasn’t yet got a level of maturity in its integrated thinking.

most annual reports contain some form of case studies these days. they’re used to illustrate a strategy in action and provide proof points for directional statements. analyse your case studies. you may be surprised at how many of them tick more than one of your strategy boxes, and impact more than one of your stakeholder groups or desired outcomes.

once you’ve identified them, surface them and actively join the dots. explain how the examples deliver on your strategies or help you towards a stated kpi goal. different case studies can deliver to different goals of course, but you will probably find that some actually deliver to more than one.

here are a couple of examples from watercare and vector which illustrate how we’ve actively helped the reader connect case studies to more than one of the business’s goals and strategies.

watercare:

note how each of these case studies reports back to watercare’s stated strategic goals (highlighted by the red boxes):

 vector:

so, look closely at your in-market activities. you may be surprised that they meet more than just commercial objectives. and take another look at your stories about your people, the environment and the community – you may well find that each meets more than one of your stated strategies.

having got to this point, you can now start to be more intentional in your non-financial planning, goal setting and kpi measurements. before you know it, integrated thinking will be happening in your organisation.

integrated reporting, connectivity, going the dots, non-financial reporting
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