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Designing the Future

20 Aug 2019 by Steven Giannoulis

Last week I was fortunate enough to attend day one of Semi-Permanent –  The Future of the Future . I do like going to these things and often walk away inspired by an idea or two. Mostly I find design events are...

Creative
designing the future steven giannoulis

last week i was fortunate enough to attend day one of semi-permanent – the future of the future. i do like going to these things and often walk away inspired by an idea or two. mostly i find design events are about the design community showing off how clever they are while trying to convince their peers that we make the world a better place. this time though, it was actually about design saving the world. 

the day started with ivy ross, head of hardware design at google. she opened with “designers are problem-solvers” which was always going to appeal to me. my philosophy is design isn’t what we do but how we do it. what we do is help our clients address the challenges and opportunities facing their businesses, and their audiences. ivy then went on to talk about how google’s hardware was designed to address the deep human needs that only a latecomer to the device market can fully appreciate. who needs another black plastic box she said – and i agree. everything about the design was thoughtful and human, led by natural shapes, textures and colours that drive feelings. better still, it was made with innovative, environmentally friendly, natural materials.

and then there was google’s a space for being exhibition at milan design week. wow! i’ve always known design is about how it makes you feel but now we know that your body physically reacts to it as well. design can help with stress, anxiety and happiness. lesson learnt: surround yourself with stuff that makes you feel good. 

 “i’ve always known design is about how it makes you feel but now we know that your body physically reacts to it as well”

 

the kickstarter guy – charles adler– was interesting in showing the pace of change and illustrating the idea of technology bringing us closer together. the outtake: with so much rapid change, the rules are always temporary, just waiting for someone to break them. 

“the rules are always temporary, just waiting for someone to break them”

  

bruce mau from massive change network blew my mind. after all, he’s redesigning the holy city of mecca and making beautiful furniture from coke bottles. he talked about the rapid pace of change and the problems we humans have created. he felt, as designers, we have a responsibility to redesign everything to find answers to the biggest challenges we face as a race. he invited us to ‘imagineer’ in order to create solutions that last, solutions that deliver to the needs of a world double the current population and to deliver open systems solutions that could adapt and evolve in a world of rapid change. he cited nature and indigenous cultures as sources of inspiration who’ve mastered this thinking. so next time, you’re redesigning mecca think about solutions that could still be relevant in a thousand years not just the next 20!

“think about solutions that could still be relevant in a thousand years not just the next 20!”

 

ana arriola from microsoft leads their ai capability. i was expecting a sci-fi talk about advances in technology and what the robots will do in the years to come. instead we got a very human-led talk about the biases we as humans have and how we are in danger of introducing these into a discriminating ai world. she delivered strong message about inclusivity, ubiety and asking why and not just how. you come to these events to have your mind expanded and your perceptions challenged – ana did just that.

“we are in danger of introducing human biases into a discriminating ai world”

 

we finished up with carla hjort from space10, ikea’s innovation lab. i always worry when speakers kick off with nietzche and the meaning of existence but carla’s story also featured lsd, numerous dance festivals, a cult in india and a catchy-tune about ‘feeding the horse’. the outtake for me was that she thinks differently about ikea and their contribution to the world because she’s experienced the world in such a different way. ikea’s change is driven by a clarity of purpose and a big and long-term perspective. carla, too, advocated a licence to rethink everything and, like our kickstarter guy, taking a rebellious approach.

 

my takeaways

so what do i take back to the office from this? firstly, i was struck that the bad guys – microsoft, coke, google, etc – are potentially also the good guys in disguise. on a more personal level: know your purpose, have principles, think bigger and bolder, think longer-term, challenge convention and always use our design superpower for good. the world’s got big problems – environmental, scarcity of resources, the pressure of time and change, inclusiveness and many more. everything we do every day should be part of a bigger solution, or at the very least not add to the problem. ivy said it best “as people trained to design solutions, it would be remiss of us not to help solve the biggest problems facing our planet.”  

insight is going to need to add a ‘saving the world from itself’ work stream to our project taxonomy.

semi permanent, future of the future,

The ideas path

18 Sep 2018 by Steven Giannoulis

I’ve always been an ideas guy. I feel comfortable looking at a problem or an opportunity and then generating lots of ideas about how to tackle it in a creative way. I’ll go one step further and say, it’s...

Creative
the ideas path steven giannoulis

i’ve always been an ideas guy. i feel comfortable looking at a problem or an opportunity and then generating lots of ideas about how to tackle it in a creative way. i’ll go one step further and say, it’s one of the things i’m good at. but if i am going to be so shamelessly boastful i should be a bit more specific: it’s the quantity of ideas - not necessarily the quality – that i’m good at.

i’m not saying all my ideas are rubbish (though many are), just that the particular skill i bring to the idea generation process is helping generate that initial long list that eventually leads to one or two nuggets coming alive. after all, all innovative ideas have to start somewhere. often one of my seemingly random thoughts gets refined, expanded and turned it into something good that barely resembles the original idea.

so, what’s the trick to coming up with lots of ideas quickly? the honest answer is, i don’t always know where my ideas come from. i’m not shy in coming forward so often it appears as simply just saying random stuff. it’s not all that loose though, i do have a couple of techniques to help find ideas, wherever they are hiding.

  1. learning. there’s not much in the marketing and comms field i haven’t seen before. yes, technology is different and some channels are different but clients’ objectives and customers’ basic needs remain largely the same. so, i examine a challenge in order to understand the real problem that needs to be solved. i then consider other scenarios where i’ve solved this same problem before. this isn’t about copying the same good idea again and again but about leveraging past learning. i think about why i used that solution and what worked and what didn’t. this gives me insights on how to start thinking about the challenge in front of me. 

  2. parallels. it’s one thing to look at what other agencies around the world have done with the same challenge. this is a useful start but can often lead to ‘me too’ thinking. i find it’s better to seek the parallels in other industries and other environments. how have they solved this same problem in their field? what’s the core insight and idea behind their solution? how can we apply this same thinking here to solve the challenge in front of us?

  3. building. my approach to idea generation is to be unfiltered. i love mind-maps so, when brainstorming, i look to rapidly connect ideas and follow the path to see where it leads. follow your head. follow your gut. often this means spitting out whatever half-baked idea is forming in my head and then building on the idea out loud. this gives others the opportunity to add their thoughts and perspectives, helping the idea grow and take shape.

  4. perspectives. the most useful tool i use for idea generation is looking at the challenge differently. i always have this matrix image in my head when i talk about this. the challenge is suspended in mid-air and we spin around it in slow-mo, looking at it from different angles. i run through a checklist of what ifs in my head. what if the client was different? what if the target audience was different? what if the goals were different? what if time and budget were no issue? what if there was no money or time? what if we doubled the problem? halved it? multiplied it? most of these perspectives go nowhere, generating ideas that have others thinking i’m a complete idiot. but sometimes one of those idiotic thoughts becomes the first spark of a really good idea.

my advice for generating ideas is to free your inhibitions and let your ideas take you to new and unexpected places. one idea sparks the next, taking you down an uncertain path until a moment of clarity reveals itself. and avoid judging your ideas too early, as you’ll quickly close off the most interesting and rewarding paths.

idea generation, innovation, creativity

The strategy of design

21 Jun 2018 by Steven Giannoulis

We describe ourselves as a strategic-creative agency. This leads to the obvious question, what is it? You just design stuff, right? Strategic-creative is about how we go about making sure that the stuff we create is...

Creative
the strategy of design steven giannoulis

we describe ourselves as a strategic-creative agency. this leads to the obvious question, what is it? you just design stuff, right? strategic-creative is about how we go about making sure that the stuff we create is fit for purpose and delivers results for our clients. 

strategy in the design world is very different to strategy in a military, corporate or even advertising world. what they have in common is that sense of thinking about where we are now, where we want to be and making a plan to get there. here’s a quick run-down on how a design agency strategist fits into the design process.

understanding of the brief

finding a great solution starts by understanding the real problem to be solved. a strategist engages the client, asks lots of why questions and listens in order to really understand what is needed. how does this brief align with the value drivers and the business, brand and marketing plans? what will success look like and how will we measure it? a well-defined problem is critical to helping the team come up with a well-conceived solution.

  1. audiences. a strategist defines the target audience, their needs and motivators and what their current behaviours and perceptions are. this clarity helps everyone on a project focus on what journey we need to take the audience on. audience insights mostly come from research – either directly by talking to them or through secondary sources. often it comes from a long-held appreciation of human psychology, group dynamics and organisational behaviour.
  2. frameworks. there are a number of proven best-practice models that define core communication processes like engagement, decision-making and purchase. a good strategist knows when and how to apply these frameworks to different briefs in order to move audiences towards the desired outcomes.
  3. positioning. working closely with the designer, the strategist helps define how something should be positioned in the eyes of audiences through its messaging, tone and visual language. this positioning allows a differentiated market offer that aligns closely with the audience needs and motivators.
  4. channel/medium selection. good thinking and design is pointless if it doesn’t reach and/or register with audiences. the strategist works with the designer to identify the best way to get to audiences, and what mediums work best. 
  5. creative development. as we move into design, the designer takes lead on the creative process. the strategist plays a supporting role, helping identify and evaluate design ideas and approaches. they review designs and provide feedback to help improve single-mindedness, effectiveness and strategic alignment with the brief and audience needs.
  6. selling ideas. rarely do clients buy into an idea just because it’s a thing of beauty. mostly they chose it because they can see its potential to solve their problem or realise an opportunity. the strategist works closely with the design team to sell-in an idea to the client by highlighting how it will deliver the results they need.

 

strategic-creative is both a mindset and a process, ensuring that the discipline of being creative to a brief is geared towards achieving the right outcomes. strategy-creative equals better design – but i would say that, i’m a strategist.  

creative, strategy, strategic creative, insight creative

Feeling the work

19 Jun 2018 by Steven Giannoulis

  Yesterday Brian and I had our monthly one-to-one meeting while walking around the new Te Papa Art Gallery –  Toi Art.  We wanted to talk about how to raise our creativity to the next level and...

Creative
feeling the work steven giannoulis
 
yesterday brian and i had our monthly one-to-one meeting while walking around the new te papa art gallery – toi art. we wanted to talk about how to raise our creativity to the next level and what better place than amongst an eclectic collection of the best nz art.
 
toi is brilliant and we were both inspired and talked excitedly for an hour and a half. we had different pieces that spoke to us. brian fell in love with the story-telling associated with a small house from outer space in the detour collection. i was taken by the possibilities and perspectives reflected in the crochet circles part of the colour section.
 
the big take out of our walk was that we can go even further in our drive to make people feel something from our work – joy, anger, passion, nostalgia, pride, etc. (yes, even an annual report can do that!)  to take our designs to another level, we must work harder to engage audiences at an emotional level, making them feel something. think about your favourite movies, art, books and music – chances are they are your favourites because of the emotions they stir in you.
 
we came up with a number of ways to capture the feeling the client wants in the brief; how we can ensure our territories have a strong single feeling aligned with what audiences need and will respond to; and how to engage our client in going with creating a feeling rather than literally telling audiences stuff.
 
it has already started informing our idea creation on new projects.
 
if you get a chance to go to te papa toi art, do it. it’s well worth it.
inspiration, creativity, effective design

Dem Kiwi styles

01 May 2018 by Steven Giannoulis

I was recently asked to be part of a discussion on the Kiwi design aesthetic which got me thinking about the topic. So here are my views on what defines the Kiwi style. Given I’m not a trained designer or...

Creative
dem kiwi styles steven giannoulis

i was recently asked to be part of a discussion on the kiwi design aesthetic which got me thinking about the topic. so here are my views on what defines the kiwi style. given i’m not a trained designer or artist, there is a good chance my views are well wide of the mark. i can only tell you what i see and feel.

 

like many, i’m of the view that a country’s approach to the creative arts is a strong reflection of its culture. australian and american creativity is broadly bright, loud and confident, very much like the cultures of those nations. scandinavian design is minimalist, considered and efficient. french design is sensual, with flair and individualism.

it follows then that kiwi design is like us: understated, individual, complex and extremely grounded in nature and reality. we seek to tell stories by creating moods and feelings, crediting our audiences with a level of intellect, rather than always stating the obvious. it doesn’t mean that it’s all dark, brooding and intellectual, in fact, it is often the complete opposite, as we rarely take ourselves too seriously. the hunt for the wilderpeople may be one of the best expressions of the kiwi creative mindset with its complex relationships showcased through off-beat humour.

much of our graphic design style comes from our colonial heritage but, whether we like to admit it or not, our graphic palette also has a strong pacific flavor to it. we see this often in simple two-dimensional shapes made to stand out against flat colours. similar to the japanese aesthetic, we prefer design to not be overly perfect and crafted but to feel natural. we favour flowing forms over straight lines, again a reflection of our surroundings.

the tone of our work is often muted and dark with a heavy dose of realism. we use a lot of natural and rustic colours such as greys, greens and browns to express the world around us. we prefer real life over presenting places and scenarios in idealistic ways. and reality is also the driver for depicting people, staying away from over emphasising an individual’s positive assets, preferring to highlight their imperfections.

what i love most about the kiwi aesthetic is our use of language. there’s always that cheeky, sarcasm-loaded, sense of irreverence that reflects kiwi humour and our ‘she’ll be right’ approach to life. i think it’s what makes our work, particularly in advertising, stand out from work from around the world.

the nz design aesthetic will continue to evolve as the diverse tapestry that makes up our nation broadens and as we become more regional and global. to some degree i welcome this, but i do worry that our style will become less our own. i’d like to see us embrace more of the maori and pacific flavours that make our design voice unique, while also working hard to ensure our kiwi tone of voice never loses its cutting edge.

what do you think defines the kiwi design aesthetic?

image from https://www.glennjonesart.com/products/kiwiana-flavour

new zealand design style

Human trends - not design fad

17 Apr 2018 by Steven Giannoulis

This article appeared in the Autum 2018 edition of Idealog magazine It might surprise you to know that, even though I run a design agency, I loathe the notion of latest design trends. In my view, they promote a...

Creative
human trends - not design fad steven giannoulis

this article appeared in the autum 2018 edition of idealog magazine

it might surprise you to know that, even though i run a design agency, i loathe the notion of latest design trends. in my view, they promote a distorted view of what effective design is and unnecessarily emphasise the tactical components of design rather than the outcomes they deliver. i am particularly frustrated when (mostly junior) creatives suggest a design that is a blatant homage to the look our industry is currently obsessed with. this leads to lazy, unoriginal design not driven by the needs of the client or the audience we are trying to engage.

i therefore hesitated when asked to write a ‘latest design trends’ article. so often these articles just represent the writer’s opinions and preferences on what is “hot right now.” i just couldn’t bring myself to do this, so if you’re expecting recommendations on a particular shade of beetroot red or a kerning style then this isn’t the article for you.

good design is as much a study of human psychology as it is a technical skill. for me, design trends represent shifts in consumer preferences and behaviours. they are driven by cultural and social changes, technology, new channels and mediums and changing consumer demographics. so my design trends aren’t the hot new thing but fundamental consumer shifts that inform the way we should be approaching all design communications.

think human. seek engagement. be authentic and responsible. tell stories. go simple.

think human. based on a number of well known design-thinking philosophies, human centric design has grown as an idea thanks largely to the user experience (ux/ui) emphasis in web design. the core idea though extends to all design – put the needs of your audience at the forefront of the design.

start with the underlying human need that the design is looking to address, both physical and emotional. this immediately gives you a sense of the tone and feel needed. then think about the user’s journey. what leads them to your communication and why? is this the communication piece that creates that desire to buy or the rational follow-up that convinces the head that it’s okay to buy what the heart wants? and finally, think about how the end audience will interact with your communication. always work with audience expectations, creating an easy, intuitive and natural interaction. 

seek engagement. in the last decade, we’ve seen a huge drive to digital. it’s reshaped advertising, direct marketing and pr and the way we think about design and branding. digital offers reach and cost-efficiency but often it’s at the expense of audience engagement. and that’s why in some areas we’ve seen a shift back to using more physical mediums to connect with audience. this manifests in simple things like a handwritten note, a clever direct mail piece or sending a printed newsletter rather than firing another email into a crowded inbox.

at the more complex end, it’s about creating experiences that audiences can interact with, immersing themselves in your brand. this trend is influencing the design of physical spaces like office and shop fit outs. it’s also driving the growth of temporary spaces, like containers, as experience centres that utilise both physical and virtual reality (vr) to create full-sensory experiences. with vr spanning the digital and physical worlds, and its growing accessibility, we see this becoming a leading force for delivering more meaningful audience engagements.

be authentic and responsible. there are some significant social trends that are changing expectation of communications and design. first, there is a move against the over-manufactured reality that we were increasingly fed over the last few decades. consumers now want authenticity and that means representing everyday people, in real locations and situations using everyday language. not that there isn’t room for hyperbole, fantasy or escapism, but we can’t keep passing off fake as real.

and there’s a growing sense of responsibility for our actions and those of others. catalysts like #metoo, global migration and environmental change have consumers looking at communicator’s social purpose, credentials and actions. we must reflect this in design application, through the responsible depiction of gender, race and environment and with more considered application of language and humour.

tell stories. ironically, social media with its short word counts has driven growth in story-telling. as instagram shows us, a picture (and a few words) can tell a powerful, engaging story. it’s facilitated the move from saying things to showing them. audience’s want organisations to tell stories that demonstrate who they are and what they stand for, allowing audiences to seek alignment with their own beliefs and ideologies.

designers can learn from social media on how good stories engage audiences. this means capturing those real moments, and the feelings they evoke, as well as finding ways for audiences to become part of the story.

go simple. our lives are busy. email, news and social feeds bombard us constantly across multiple channels and devices. in this cluttered world, getting cut-through and resonance with communications is increasingly difficult. design can help bring calm and order to this chaotic world and that’s why we are seeing a rise of simpler design approaches. make it as easy for audiences to engage with less visual clutter, clean colour palettes and typography, good navigation and sign-posting, fewer words and meaningful icons and graphics.

applying all the above won’t necessarily make your designs more effective in driving audience perceptions or behaviours. as i said earlier, good communication design is about understanding the human psyche and this changes from audience to audience, situation to situation, and brief to brief. however, considering how to apply these (so-called) trends will go a long way to helping solve any design challenge from a consumer-led perspective.

design trends, design fads, effective design

SIT & Innovate

04 Apr 2018 by Steven Giannoulis

I’ve been thinking a lot about how we innovate and how we help our clients do the same. In an industry where much of what we do has been commoditised, our most valuable skill is our ability to think creatively in...

Creative
sit & innovate steven giannoulis

i’ve been thinking a lot about how we innovate and how we help our clients do the same. in an industry where much of what we do has been commoditised, our most valuable skill is our ability to think creatively in helping our clients solve the problems that matter most to them. i’d heard of strategic inventive thinking (sit) but had never taken the time to really understand it. thanks to a course on lynda.com, now i’m a big fan.

sit uses a number of tricks and techniques that require you to look ‘inside the box’ to unlock ‘outside the box’ thinking. it starts with the existing solution rather than the problem itself. (now that’s innovative in its own right.) and it’s a technique many successful firms, like apple and 3m,­­ have been using for ages.

"sit uses a number of tricks and techniques that require you to look ‘inside the box’ to unlock ‘outside the box’ thinking."

for each existing solution to a particular problem, you identify its key components and attributes and then use the following techniques to think differently about them:

  1. subtraction – what if we take away certain features and functions? apparently, the idea for the ipad came by applying this technique to the laptop.
  2. task unification – what if we associated relationships in different ways. rather than having its own cooling motor, what if your fridge was kept cool by your home’s air conditioning system? no motor and suddenly the fridge has more capacity for food, is cheaper and quicker to manufacture. and you have more possibilities for shape and size!
  3. multiplication – what if there were more that one of these components? what if your laptop had more than one screen? what if your phone had a screen on the front and the back?
  4. division – what if rather than having one big feature we have lots of small ones? the development of the dish draw dishwasher is a good example of this thinking.
  5. attribute dependency – rethinking what a thing is designed to do. what if it did something else instead? what if your light-bulb also heated your room for example? the best example is the mobile phone. someone said what if it wasn’t just for calls but a mini-computer, a camera, a dictaphone, a mini-tv, an audio device, a games console, etc. and now it is.

 

once you’ve generated lots of ideas using these techniques, they are evaluated against both customer needs and the feasibility to produce.

the two things that i like most about the sit approach are:

(1) it’s driven by customer-led design thinking – it’s not about brainstorming wild ideas but really thinking about the customer experience and how to better meet their underlying needs and wants; and

(2) it targets ‘fixedness’ thinking which stops innovation. fixedness is the pre-set ideas we have that things need to be in a certain place, look or work in a certain way or work in tandem with something else. change your mind-set on these and you open your mind to a whole lot of possibilities.

innovation leads to new, useful and surprising outcomes that allow our customers, and their customers, to better have their needs met. i’m a firm believer that innovation comes from within – changing your perspective – and that’s why strategic inventive thinking really appeals. the next step is for us to give sit a go. what if…..?

sit, strategic inventive thinking, innovation, creative thinking

Wider opening jaws: it’s what clients really want.

26 Mar 2018 by Steven Giannoulis

  A hang-up from my client-side days is that I expect my agency to be all about delivering on my goals. After all, business results – not big ideas and clever design - are what I’m paying for. Agency...

Creative
wider opening jaws: it’s what clients really want. steven giannoulis

 

a hang-up from my client-side days is that i expect my agency to be all about delivering on my goals. after all, business results – not big ideas and clever design - are what i’m paying for. agency leaders have a responsibility to ensure their teams understand the basics of business so they work on solving the problems that really matter to clients.

we recently launched a series of staff training presentations to ensure all staff have the skills to live our client-first value. the first two sessions were run by actual clients. now that was cool. the first session focused on the client/agency relationship and what clients value. the importance of strategy, transparency and accountability came through very strongly. the second looked at the client decision-making process from business planning, budgeting, business case development right through to sign-offs and how the effectiveness of our work is measured. 

for the third session, i went back to my uni days to cover the fundamentals of business strategy. clients often tell us that they want a brochure, a website or something similar without explaining the why. it’s this why that tells us what they really want, how best to approach the challenge and what results we need to deliver.

"the importance of strategy, transparency and accountability came through very strongly"

we started the session with milton friedman’s free-market theories and gordon gecko’s ‘greed is good’ philosophy before easing into triple-bottom line thinking. this sparked lively debate on the real purpose of business, with few siding with a pure capitalist mindset. we have a variety of clients from small, medium and big business, government agencies and ngos, so the discussion quickly identified that long-term value (both real and perceived) means something different for each of them.

we then focused on profit using the old-fashioned ‘opening the profit-jaws’ analogy to understand the decisions our clients might make around profit. we boiled it down to three basic drivers: (1) make more profit today; (2) make more tomorrow; or (3) create more certainty of making profit. broadly, all decisions are about more revenue, less costs and/or less risk. economic theorists are no-doubt horrified by this naivety but simplicity was crucial here.

for revenue, we used the classic pie metaphor to address market share, share of wallet and new market segments. for cost drivers, we first discussed productivity and efficiency and how companies try to do more with less. we then talked quality and how it helps reduce wastage, rework and ultimately cost. we related this back to how we approached our own work.

"we spent time pondering what some of our clients cared about most by considering their value chain, their sustainable advantage and competitive strategies"

and we talked about the reward maximisation vs risk minimisation trade-off companies face, the competitive forces they operate within and the various factors that add to their uncertainty. we considered some of the client briefs we work on and how they drive profit by managing risk.

we spent some time pondering what some of our clients cared about most by considering their value chain, their sustainable advantage and competitive strategies. 

we finished by discussing some of the key work we do – brand, websites, campaigns, staff engagement programmes and annual reports – and how we might approach each one differently if the client driver is revenue, cost or risk management.

to provide effective client solutions agencies need to understand the real business problems they are trying to solve for their clients. design people don’t naturally take to numbers and business concepts but it’s knowledge that all design agency leaders need to invest in if we are going to elevate our industry from ‘making things pretty’ to true business enablers.

design, business, creative investment, creative agencies

Bitchin' about Pitching

03 Oct 2017 by Steven Giannoulis

New business pitches are a fact of life and I’d be concerned if we weren’t involved in them on a regular basis. All I ask is that clients play fair. Here’s some things that annoy me most about pitching. ...

Creative
bitchin' about pitching steven giannoulis

new business pitches are a fact of life and i’d be concerned if we weren’t involved in them on a regular basis. all i ask is that clients play fair. here’s some things that annoy me most about pitching.

invite the world / ask for the world.
clients have a responsibility to do a little bit of work themselves to determine what they need and who could potentially do their work, rather than just putting open tenders out there or inviting lots of agencies. if they genuinely don’t know who’s available, and can’t get recommendations from others, then they should put a simple and quick eoi (expression of interest) out there. use the responses to shortlist a handful and invite only those to pitch.

worse than a big invite list is a huge list of requirements. often it means answering fifty plus questions to get to round two, only to have further requirements to complete, followed by a presentation. many pitches take thirty plus hours to prepare, some more than double that. ask us for what you really need, not everything you can possibly think of.

asking for free stuff.
our general rule is that we’ll never pitch for anything that requires us to present work. it’s just rude to ask a specialist to do work and not expect to pay for it. we’re happy to demonstrate our capability with some general thinking or direction but we draw the line at being asked to present a specific strategy or creative concept.

if you want to test us, give us a small brief and pay us to deliver the work. if you like it then it’s win/win. and if don’t want to keep working with us, then don't, but the work is yours to keep.

be transparent.
just recently we did a pitch where we went through a number of stages only to be told they had a small fixed budget. it would have been good to have been told the budget upfront as we may have not gone for it. more likely we would have presented two quotes. the first based on their requirements. the second, showing what they’d get for the money they have.

worse still is where there is an agency the client wants to work with but they’re required to do a competitive pitch. i’ve been on both sides and having to pitch for work you’ve already won is just as frustrating as pitching for work you’re never going to win.

always tell us honestly what the evaluation criteria are and if you have specific requirements about where we are located, the type of agency we need to be or the level of sexual or ethnic diversity we must display to win the pitch.

let’s talk about the price.
earlier this year we pitched for an account and apparently outscored in all areas other than price. the prospective client rang us and was upfront about their dilemma. they wanted to work with us but were struggling to get it over the line with their board. after some discussion, we agreed on a new approach to pricing that was palatable to all.

so, if price is the only issue that’s stopping you from picking us, let’s have a conversation. but don’t do it just to screw our price down. in the long-term we’ll find a way to get the value we need. generally, it’s by having no flexibility with scope and charging you for absolutely everything.

give us feedback.
providing open, honest and constructive feedback to all parties at the end of a pitch process is mandatory. i often ask up front if feedback will be available and this helps me decide whether to go for a pitch or not. no feedback tells me something about the one-way relationship we'd be in for.

we have a criteria for what we pitch for and how much we’ll invest to get it. we only go for stuff we genuinely want to do and know we can do well. in return, we ask for a similar level of respect from anyone who invites us to pitch for their work.

pitching, new business

Can you resist?

03 Apr 2017 by Steven Giannoulis

Over the weekend, I read a great book called  Hidden Persuasion  (Andrews, van Leeuwen & van Baaren). It’s a book about the persuasive techniques used by clever marketers to get us to buy or do...

Creative
can you resist? steven giannoulis

over the weekend, i read a great book called hidden persuasion (andrews, van leeuwen & van baaren). it’s a book about the persuasive techniques used by clever marketers to get us to buy or do stuff.

every day we are bombarded by hundreds of messages designed to persuade us how to feel, act, do and be. most of the time we lack the conscious awareness to process them. but some of these really get through, changing our perceptions, attitudes and behaviours. often we don’t even know it’s happened.

so what is that hidden persuasion technique that creates this cut-through?

the book outlines 33 persuasion techniques (many i know and use already) including metaphor, humour, scarcity, attraction, authority, fear, disruption, self-persuasion, social proof, promised land and of course, sex appeal. these techniques have been proven again and again and the authors give us lots of examples of results delivered in advertising.

i particularly like ideas like decoy: where consumers are choosing between two options, and a third option is introduced to create a bias. you often see this in cafés with a small, medium and large coffee offered. the large option costs just 50 cents more that medium, making the medium the decoy designed to make the large look like the best value. end result, we end up upsizing (just as the café wanted us to).

what strikes me about these techniques is that they’re not just gimmicks but rooted in psychology and social influence. as you read through them you can practically hear maslow saying “see, i was right about people’s basic needs and the priority they come in!”  these techniques work because they operate at three levels:

  1. they appeal to our hardwired responses, such as the fight or flight response, which are core to what makes us human;
  2. our deep social needs like love, respect, popularity and belonging; and
  3. our self-needs like self-worth, identity, pain avoidance, wealth, safety and survival.

when marketers use imagery and language that taps into these fundamental needs, resistance is futile. and our unconscious bias for attractive faces, symmetrical design or humourous copy means we don’t resist because we don’t even know we’re being persuaded.

the other thing that i like about these techniques is how they still apply today, even though the way we reach and engage audiences has changed. they work on websites, in video, on social media pages, in smm and sem campaigns, e-marketing and they still work just as well across traditional marketing and communications mediums.

persuasion, marketing

User journeys - more than a web thing

27 Oct 2015 by Steven Giannoulis

A great article by Steven Giannoulis in the November/December issue of Idealog. This one explores UX (User Experience), and tracks the notion beyond the website to its application to any customer experience in any,...

Creative
user journeys - more than a web thing steven giannoulis

a great article by steven giannoulis in the november/december issue of idealog. this one explores ux (user experience), and tracks the notion beyond the website to its application to any customer experience in any, and across many, channels.

 

design, user journeys, user experience

Getting Customers - by design

12 Oct 2015 by Steven Giannoulis

The September/October issue of Idealog magazine features an article by our CEO, Steven Giannoulis. It canvasses the user journey from Awareness and onto the pathway towards a sale - and the important role that design...

Creative
getting customers - by design steven giannoulis

the september/october issue of idealog magazine features an article by our ceo, steven giannoulis. it canvasses the user journey from awareness and onto the pathway towards a sale - and the important role that design plays. the primary out take is the need to design the whole journey, not just one component of it. definitely worth a click and a read.

deisgn, idealog, insight creative

Investment in design

26 Jun 2015 by Steven Giannoulis

Or more accurately, 'Design in investment'. Steven Giannoulis' latest article in Idealog magazine that hit subscribers today, canvasses the role that design plays in making complex information clear and understandable...

Creative
investment in design steven giannoulis

or more accurately, 'design in investment'. steven giannoulis' latest article in idealog magazine that hit subscribers today, canvasses the role that design plays in making complex information clear and understandable for investors - from the start up, through the private business and right on to the ipo or listed company capital raising. no matter what stage in the business lifecycle, the principles of clear communication are much the same. click to enlarge and read:

deisgn, idealog, insight creative

Design as a business enabler

20 Feb 2015 by Steven Giannoulis

The first of our six double page spreads in Idealog Magazine for the year has just hit the bookshelves. The theme of our articles is the role of design as a valuable business enabler and accelerator. Have a read of...

Creative
design as a business enabler steven giannoulis

the first of our six double page spreads in idealog magazine for the year has just hit the bookshelves. the theme of our articles is the role of design as a valuable business enabler and accelerator. have a read of the first one:

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