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How much is design worth to the NZ economy?

02 Aug 2017 by Mike Tisdall

A new study by PWC released last week calculates design's economic contribution to New Zealand is $10.1 billion - yes, that's BILLION. Approximately 4.2 % of the country's total GDP. The research reveals that if...

Creative
how much is design worth to the nz economy? mike tisdall

a new study by pwc released last week calculates design's economic contribution to new zealand is $10.1 billion - yes, that's billion. approximately 4.2 % of the country's total gdp. the research reveals that if design were treated as an individual industry its contribution to the new zealand economy would be larger than agriculture and on a par with retail trade ($10.6 billion), and food, beverage and tobacco product manufacturing. the sector also provides approximately 94,200 fte design positions in new zealand, roughly 4.4 per cent of employment.

the value of design report was commissioned by designco, a consortium which comprises massey university’s college of creative arts, the designers institute of new zealand, otago polytechnic school of design, nzte, aut’s school of art and design, the auckland co-design lab, callaghan innovation and victoria university’s school of design. 

finance minister stephen joyce expressed his excitement in his forward to the report: “design is a powerful tool of the modern, interconnected world,” he said. “it is a key component of innovation, turning great ideas into services and products that consumers want to buy and use, it can help ensure that public services are user-friendly and more efficient, and it can help make cities more attractive places for citizens and skilled migrants to live and work. in short, these design-led firms are contributing to new zealand’s success as a diversified, resilient and growing economy.”

professor claire robinson, pro vice chancellor at massey's college of creative arts and convener of designco, was even more succinct. “there is a strong correlation between national prosperity, economic growth and a thriving design sector,” she said. “international evidence confirms that design leads to more competitive firms making and selling higher value products and services."

among designco’s recommendations for future actions are:

  • treasury to develop a national design strategy in collaboration with the new zealand design sector.
  • establish and fund a body similar to the uk design council responsible for the strategic coordination of design in new zealand, bringing together the design industry, research and education.
  • establish a programme of business support for the use of design by smes, similar to the nzte better by design programme.
  • increase targeted funding support for design-led service transformation in the public sector.
  • widen the current conceptualisation of stem to include creative arts subjects such as design and creative media production, and increase the efts funding for these subject areas.
  • establish a dedicated research fund for design researchers to access, and infrastructure to support the allocation of funds (separate from science, health or arts funding).

you can see the value of design report in full here.

 

 

 

design, economic contribution

Big Ideas start small

24 Jul 2017 by Mike Tisdall

In the June issue, CEO, Steven Giannoulis, tells NZMarketing magazine that 'good design should always deliver business results for the client'. In NZMarketing's research for the prior issue of the magazine, marketers...

Creative
big ideas start small mike tisdall

in the june issue, ceo, steven giannoulis, tells nzmarketing magazine that 'good design should always deliver business results for the client'. in nzmarketing's research for the prior issue of the magazine, marketers expressed their frustration at an industry generally more interested in winning creative awards than truly helping the client - something steven had been on the receiving end of when he worked client-side. this is part of the reason he does everything he can to ensure that the work that insight develops actually drives value for the client.

click the image to read the full article.

 

ideas, driving value

Why design is more than meets the eye

21 Oct 2015 by Mike Tisdall

From NBR, Friday 16 October Design was never about making products more attractive. It’s now treated as a way of thinking: a creative process that spans entire organisations, driven by the desire to better...

Creative
why design is more than meets the eye mike tisdall

from nbr, friday 16 october

design was never about making products more attractive.

it’s now treated as a way of thinking: a creative process that spans entire organisations, driven by the desire to better understand and meet consumer needs.

last week’s design institute awards attracted around 1000 industry participants yet the dominant impression was that their potential is being wasted. noel brown, an awards judge and a director of design firm dna, says the majority of companies still use design only as a tactic.

“not many and very few really big businesses are joining all the dots and using design strategically,” he says. “at the heart of being better is really understanding your customers, understanding them so deeply you can predict what they will value, respond to and, of course, buy. gaining this insight and then imaginatively delivering on it is design.”

mr brown speaks for many who say strategic use of design means organising the business around the goal. “they have to alter the way they control risks, the way they invest and the way they manage,” he says. “the design process doesn’t fit neatly within corporate lines of control and the design mind-set doesn’t run on straight lines. it is always challenging – and uncomfortable.”

mr brown co-convened the best effect category, which was judged for the impact of design on the business. the winner, menswear chain barkers, was a standout example. “in some commercial difficulty they radically redesigned the way they do business, with the wants, needs, dreams and whims of their customers firmly in mind,” mr brown says. “their clothing, stores, communication and more have been reimagined to win and hold the heart, heads and wallets of their customers.”

another example is powershop, a winner at previous awards. a start-up launched by meridian energy, it set out to make people care about the energy they used, how it was generated and where they bought it. “they started by really understanding what would move people from their indifference,” mr brown says. “several years down the track they have a strong, loyal and growing base of customers who go so far as to monitor their power usage regularly on their mobile app and change when and how they buy to optimise financial and environmental savings.”

design stories always mention steve jobs, who created the world’s most valuable company with what he called “magical design.” when he died, “people wanted to know what this design thing he did was,” says kleiner perkins caufield & byers design partner john maeda, who was interviewed by mckinsey for a recent research paper. “how is that the advent of mobile is fundamentally changing the need to think about design, the interaction and the experience in a substantive way?” he asks, adding somewhat cryptically: “if you think about design adding value, a lot of what people don’t understand is that sometimes the best design consultants will tell you not to design it.”

design, as you will have gathered, can be hard to define. but an evening spent with a thousand others seeing hundreds of examples provides one answer: you know when you see it.

 

nevil gibson, nbr

oragnisation design,

Our views sought on the new bank notes

12 Oct 2015 by Mike Tisdall

Insight's Creative Director, Brian Slade, was recently asked by StopPress for his erudite views on the design of New Zealand's new bank notes. See what he had to say here .  ...

Creative
our views sought on the new bank notes mike tisdall

insight's creative director, brian slade, was recently asked by stoppress for his erudite views on the design of new zealand's new bank notes. see what he had to say here.

 

design, bank notes

Insight scores five of the Best

19 Aug 2015 by Mike Tisdall

The 2015 Best Awards finalists have been announced and we’re thrilled to have scored five finalists in five different categories: Business Communication: 2014 Stand Children’s Services Annual Report Small...

Creative
insight scores five of the best mike tisdall

the 2015 best awards finalists have been announced and we’re thrilled to have scored five finalists in five different categories:

business communication: 2014 stand children’s services annual report

small brand identity: ibby 2016 international congress

design communication: new zealand symphony orchestra 2015 season marketing collateral

colour award: new zealand symphony orchestra 2015 season marketing collateral

self-promotion: ‘pause’ christmas video

 

design, awards, best awards

Two spaces after a period: Why you should never, ever do it.

16 Aug 2014 by Mike Tisdall

This Slate article unpacks why typography states that everyone needs to quit with the two spaces to begin a new sentence. The dreaded double space was an advent for the  typewriter age, two spaces were required...

Creative
two spaces after a period: why you should never, ever do it. mike tisdall

this slate article unpacks why typography states that everyone needs to quit with the two spaces to begin a new sentence. the dreaded double space was an advent for the  typewriter age, two spaces were required as the font used was always a monospace font, which meant words  l o o k  l i k e  t h i s . monospace fonts are exactly as the name describes, uniformly spaced letters. while a wide letter like an m fit in the allowed space comfortably, an i will have a lot of room on either side. because of this, an extra space was necessary to indicate that a new sentence was beginning. which is totally reasonable, typewriters.

but we don’t use them now. people put a lot of effort into making sure that the kerning (the spacing allowed between individual letters) is perfect. the computer age has allowed for highly dynamic kerning, some letters interact well with other letters and poorly with some. take for example “lt”. see that the top of the t hangs over the bottom of the l? compare that with “le”. even though the t should create an awkward space between it and the l, it knows to come closer together to allow for visual consistency.

and when you double space after a full-stop you’re thumbing your nose to all that wonderful innovation.

plus it looks ugly as all hell.

sorry if that’s all super nerdy, but really i’m not sorry. typewriters were a blip on the radar, and they adapted the double space for legibility. now everyone needs to drop the double space for legibility.

read aaaaaall about it right here:

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