Insightful.

Our thinking and opinion on the things that matter to those in the marketing, communications and design industries.

Keep up to date

Thank you for being late (Thomas L. Friedman)

04 Apr 2017 by Paul Saris

I don’t like arriving late but what if, as Mr Friedman suggests in his book, it can create value.  Being late, early in the process, can create time to reflect and, above all, clarity. Clarity we so often...

Inside Insight
thank you for being late (thomas l. friedman) paul saris

i don’t like arriving late but what if, as mr friedman suggests in his book, it can create value. 

being late, early in the process, can create time to reflect and, above all, clarity. clarity we so often lack. clarity we don’t seek because there’s no time. clarity.

like you, i acutely feel this pressure to meet deadlines. and often the pressure to meet these deadlines has a canny way of overshadowing the opportunity. 

there’ve been too many days when anxiety kicked in, when i just wanted to get things underway as soon as humanly possible, so not to lose any precious time. dragging those around me into the doing, somehow trying to get on with the job. 

until i noticed someone much wiser than me ask a client a few well-chosen questions. at face value, asking these questions seemed to challenge the deadline (we were supposed to be all go, right!), but instead it helped to achieve three things:

1/ brought more clarity around what’s required and why

2/ made everyone feel more confident doing their task, and

3/ culminated in better results, delivered on time

on reflection, my best work comes from having sound client insights. a few good questions, suitably put, go a long way. 

 

btw, friedman’s book is a good read if you'd like to find out more about how we must learn to be fast (innovative and quick to adapt), fair (prepared to help the casualties of change), and slow (adept at shutting out the noise and accessing their (our clients) deepest values) – all in the age of acceleration.

meeting deadlines, slow down, clarity

When you can’t change the direction of the wind — adjust your sails (H Jackson Brown Jr)

28 Mar 2017 by Paul Saris

  A little over 20 years ago I became a father of two pretty fabulous daughters. Every year, most days I got to figure out how to be a father. Books don’t tell you everything there is to know. My own parents...

Inside Insight
when you can’t change the direction of the wind — adjust your sails (h jackson brown jr) paul saris

 

a little over 20 years ago i became a father of two pretty fabulous daughters. every year, most days i got to figure out how to be a father. books don’t tell you everything there is to know. my own parents turned out to be right more often than i’ve given them credit for (something i figured out much later in life). 

kids are kids are kids are kids. they learn to crawl just when you get used to them sitting up (all precious things soon move 6 feet off the floor). they learn to talk and before you know they talk back. let them play dress-ups in the garden and hey presto they’re dressed up and off to the ball. it seems one direction only for my daughters, called independence - all the way. i (alongside my amazing wife) figured the best i can do is to give them some good values, something to fall back on when i’m not around.

as the girls grew up and years flew passed i learned to adjust my sails, whilst staying on course, doing my best to instill these values. i think i did pretty ok, but let my girls be the better judge of that. 

likewise, most days our clients look to resolve a challenge they have. i give them process, feed them information, let them run with an idea. but adjusting my sails again, i figured i could do better, to modify how i interact with them whenever necessary, to make the overall experience worth their while. we can’t presume that they will do as we would like them to do with their brand & comms once they’re out of sight, but sure hope that through their experience working with us they truly value what we’ve taught them.

client guidance. instilling values

Victory comes from finding opportunities in problems. (Sun Tzu)

22 Mar 2017 by Paul Saris

Some years ago, as I gradually moved into a client service role, my biggest anxiety became the fear of failing our clients and letting down the people I represent. Worried to be found out, to be not quite good...

Inside Insight
victory comes from finding opportunities in problems. (sun tzu) paul saris

some years ago, as i gradually moved into a client service role, my biggest anxiety became the fear of failing our clients and letting down the people i represent. worried to be found out, to be not quite good enough for the job.

i was working at another design agency at that time, where people talked about opportunities and were actively discouraged from seeing things as problems. it all just sounded like hollow words, until it became clear to me it was ‘attitude’ they were talking about. 

dealing with clients became less tricky when i started to look at them as people just like me. using my insecurity helped me level with clients. turns out some of them were also a bit worried about being found out. others were smart and in areas very different from me. some were actually quite funny but not everyone around me thought they were funny (i get that all the time). best of all, opportunities to relate proved omnipresent. changing discussions to conversations, shifting business topics to personal. making these connections created stronger relationships where all of us became more open, until there was nothing left to be ‘found out’.

opportunities

You have to think anyway, so why not think big? (Trump)

14 Mar 2017 by Paul Saris

When I was a kid my dad told me that I don’t think. It made me very sad that he thought of me that way. Only much later in life did I work out that we were simply seeing and processing things differently and not...

Inside Insight
you have to think anyway, so why not think big? (trump) paul saris

when i was a kid my dad told me that i don’t think. it made me very sad that he thought of me that way. only much later in life did i work out that we were simply seeing and processing things differently and not very good at communicating to each other how we see things.

my dad was very analytical, good with numbers, magical with things that follow a logical process. he was a big thinker of many small things. you could see a big picture emerge once you’d added up all the little things he had in his mind. problem was extracting the little things. i seem to have flipped the other way. full of big ideas that often appear random and scattered, missing the detail. dad and i got there in the end though. standing on my own two feet in a foreign country did somehow bring our minds closer together.

most of our clients come for one of two things. they’re either looking for big ideas or need help delivering big ideas. i have come to appreciate that things go a lot smoother once i understand what people are looking for. if i always did what trump suggested i’d be in trouble.

thanks dad.

think big, understanding

I want to understand you, I study your obscure language (Alexander Pushkin)

21 Feb 2017 by Paul Saris

I think it’s about time that I say thanks to all of you who patiently endure my use of the English language.  Using good English but not quite right has had some entertaining effects on people. ‘How goes...

Inside Insight
i want to understand you, i study your obscure language (alexander pushkin) paul saris

i think it’s about time that i say thanks to all of you who patiently endure my use of the english language. 

using good english but not quite right has had some entertaining effects on people. ‘how goes it now?’ ‘well pretty good’ was the reply, with a little smile in the corner of his eye. things were a bit more painful after i worked out that ‘let me take him apart when the time is right’ means something completely different from ‘take him aside’.

in the 25 years i’ve been in new zealand, i’ve met many guests like myself who’ve come from another place. the french and german variants, south african, ethiopian, canadian, belgium, italian, russian, a few from back home, and some whose lingo totally confuses me (is manchester classified as a country?).

what we all have in common, most of the time anyway, is that we want to be understood. the same goes for our clients. they also, sometimes, speak in what seems like a foreign tongue when meaning inadvertently takes on a different guise. 

on behalf of these clients, i thank you for your patience and understanding (please keep it up).

language, understanding
Sorry, there are no results for that search.