Kids engage with fun.

Client: Puke Ariki.

Moo Poo is an educational interactive that was a lot of fun. As part of a touring exhibition called ‘In our Back Yard’, we developed a touch screen kiosk and push button interactive that showed the effects of run-off on riparian waterways.

The objective was to raise awareness and change attitudes and behaviours towards planting by rivers and the impact on our waterways. Our strategy was to target kids and their parents (largely farmers).

The approach engaged the kids with something quite cheeky – the sort of thing the children would get excited about and want to show Mum and Dad. With graphics and sound effects we made a potentially boring topic a lot of fun – we also simplified the communication down into three simple phases – each punctuated by the big countdown to the cow pooing as activated by the kids pressing the red button. The kids loved it and they, and their parents got to see first-hand the impact of ‘moo poo’ on our waterways. There were also deeper layers showing case studies that allow ‘hosts’ to use the interactive when talking to school groups.

We developed the concept, strategy, design interactive and the furniture that housed it.

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